Again the cockrobin!
     I thought I had killed it. 

 

 

1.

The island’s residents smiled when they saw Johnny walking in shorts with a robin on his shoulder. No one knew that he had learned how to talk to the bird. Johnny was 17, lanky, and tall. He took long strides with deer-like grace and had the appearance of a boxer so deeply tanned that he could very well have been of mixed blood. 

 

 

2.

Even Johnny himself couldn’t figure out how he had acquired the ability to talk to the bird. He wasn’t sure whether he spoke in bird language, or if the robin spoke in human, or if neither were the case, and it was instead a special language unto itself. Occasionally he would try to observe himself objectively when talking with the bird, but somehow he would get so involved that each time he forgot to focus. He was certain, however, of two things: that he and the robin conducted real conversations, and that he and the bird considered each other their most trusted confidents. Johnny named the robin Words. And so this is the story of Johnny and Words. 

 

 

3.

There were many books in the island’s library. Among the language-related titles alone, the shelves were filled with dictionaries of languages spoken by indigenous peoples in locations like Tibet and Madagascar. There were canine dictionaries. And there were others: Concise Cat Language, The Companion to Mirror Ideography Deciphering, The Encyclopedia of Lunar Communication, The Dictionary of Creative Celestialese, The Comprehensive Dictionary of Invisible Entities, A Random Collection of Alice’s Insults and Verbal Abuse, The Dictionary of Antelopese–Revised Edition, Conversations of the Dead: A Beginner’s Guide to Verbatim Translation, The Complete Curse Companion, Hyena: A Three-Week Self-Study Language Course, The Dictionary of Elementary Fetal Language, and Famous Quotes from Humpty-Dumpty.

 

Yet, even among all these, there was not one book on bird language. So Johnny was the only person on the island (on earth, actually) who could talk to the bird. 

 

 

4.

“In bird words,” said the robin, “arms are called human branches. Shoulders are perches and legs are called moving roots.”

 

Johnny began to laugh. “So in human language that would make birds airplanes we can’t fly in.”

 

“In bird words, an airplane is the biggest bird there is,” retorted the robin. “We call a tree, a guy; a lumberjack, an executioner. A birdcage is a concentration camp. Someone’s messy hair is known as a boarding-house dive. We write letters on leaves and the wind is our mail carrier.”

 

“Fascinating,” said Johnny.  “I suppose a bird who sings beautifully is known as a chanteur.”

 

“Yes, yes. Older birds warble like opera singers, but young ones sing any way they want. They sway on tree branches and sing to their heart’s content. You won’t find skylarks just trilling along anymore.” 

 

 

5.

Johnny had a girlfriend then. Her name was Sephra and she was the daughter of the Consulate General. Sephra had blond shoulder-length hair and an air of archaic properness. She would often read Bronté novels with a basket full of flowers on one arm or paint pictures or make the automaton play the “Serenade for the Left Hand.” Or she might spend the whole day mugging in front of the mirror as she searched for the entrance to Wonderland.

 

Sephra once sang Johnny the shortest song in the world, which began with “lo-“ and ended with “-ve”. She sang it a cappella. There was nothing in between “lo” and “ve,” so it sounded rather like low-vee if you drew out the vowels a little. But since it was supposed to be the shortest song in the world, she sang it all in one breath, “love.” She sang it for Johnny three times and he fell in love with her.

 

Johnny and Sephra liked to spend the entire day in the consulate garden leaning on the white walls covered by tropical vines and talking about everything and nothing.

 

They would discuss, for instance, whether the swirl of a snail’s shell winds left or right, if six-pointed stars exist, if it is better to open your right or left eye when kissing, if you were to open your eyes at all. They liked to talk about where the most remote location in the world is, how to retrieve something you left in a dream by mistake, and how many different words there are in the world for “love.”

 

While these two were talking, Words sat on Johnny’s shoulder happily, sometimes nodding in agreement. 

 

 

6.

“So, what do you think of Sephra?”

 

“She is cute enough,” Words replied.

 

“Would you want her as your girlfriend if you weren’t a robin?”

 

Words thought for a moment and then said, “She is cute, but I wouldn’t go that far.”

 

“Really?! How come?” Johnny asked.

 

“She is a little too innocent for my tastes. I fancy a more mature woman; a bird who can soar high in the sky.”

 

“You’re pretty cheeky for a robin,” laughed Johnny. He didn’t truly understand what Words was getting at, though. Words had wanted to say, “Sephra is not bad, but I like you better than her, Johnny; and I don’t want anyone to take you away from me.” 

 

 

7.

A young man, a young woman and a robin—this trio got quite a reputation on the island for being so close. They had rambling conversations in sunny glades or on the lawn of the consulate garden. They talked about the fact that Marmalade, the cat, had eyebrows, about the Hatter’s twins who could even pee the same distance, about the fact that the most precise isosceles triangle on the island was the Consulate Secretary’s nose, about the romance between Dormouse and Smoky Mouse, about the map of Treasure Island that the seven-year-old Carroll knit at the caucus race without even knowing it. Every so often, Sephra would compose a song and sing it to Johnny.

 

     I wrote a smoky love letter
     with a smoky pen
     on some smoky paper.
     It vanished before you read it.           

 

 

8.

Unfortunately, tales of happiness don’t continue for long. Not a year had passed when Sephra had to give Johnny some sad news.

 

“Johnny,” she said, taking a rather formal tone, “we are going to have to leave this island.”

 

“What?!” Johnny was alarmed (in the meantime, Words had blinked a hundred times).

 

“Why?”

 

“The Consulate on this island is going to be shut down. My whole family is going to move to a neighboring island,” Sephra said.

 

Johnny shook his head in disbelief.

 

“So you are going to go and leave us here?”

 

“I have no choice,” said Sephra. “I don’t want to go, but it’s all been decided for me.”

 

“Sephra!” Johnny cried out. “You don’t have to obey. You’re going to stay here on this island!”

 

But Sephra just shook her head sadly. “I can’t. My father has already packed everything and we are scheduled to leave tomorrow by emergency order of the government.” 

 

 

9.

There was a lunar eclipse on the night of the move. The island sky lit up with a sickly pink glow as cart-full after cart-full of baggage was hurried from the consulate. Rumors of an outbreak of war spread through the island. Johnny got it into his head that he would take Sephra and Words the robin to “another island” so they could all live together, even if he had to abduct her. He didn’t know if he could live without her. Words gave Sephra a message from Johnny. He wanted her to remain in the consulate until everyone had left and then hide there until he came for her.

 

The move resembled an evacuation on the eve of war. The Consular Secretary’s family loaded all their belongings onto their assigned wagons and set off for the headland’s wharf. Like the Jack of Clubs, Sergeant Tomorrow, the all-too-serious man in charge of the move, shouted loudly: “Everyone out as quickly as possible. As soon as everyone is out, we set fire to the estate!” 

 

 

10.

Johnny waved the flag decorated with black wings, which was the signal. This was the plan: when he waved the flag, Sephra was to slip out the back gate, get into the wagon which would be waiting for her, and they would go in the opposite direction from the headland’s wharf, to a bay where they would sail to another island. There were mountains of kindling stacked up around the estate.

 

“No one is left inside?” shouted Sergeant Tomorrow.

 

“Hey, Johnny,” said Words. “We can’t get Sephra out of there. Can’t we just go alone, just the two of us?”

 

“Absolutely not,” said Johnny, shaking his head. “I don’t want to live without Sephra.”

 

“If everyone has exited the building, then we will begin the next stage of operations.” Sergeant Tomorrow’s voice gushed from the megaphone as he gave this last warning. With the announcement, the gatekeeper and the lazy old cat came tumbling out.

 

“Okay, that’s everyone! No one else is inside!”

 

Just to be on the safe side, Johnny asked Words the robin to go see if Sephra had indeed slipped out the back gate. Words made one cursory flight around the grounds and came right back.

 

“Everything is okay,” Words reported. “She is standing by herself outside the gate looking lonely and miserable.”

 

Johnny didn’t notice the robin’s vaguely sad expression.

 

“I see,” said Johnny.  “Let’s watch them set fire to our last memories of this consulate and then be on our way.” 

 

 

11.

Finally, they lit the buildings on fire. The flames spread before them, lighting up the sky in brilliant crimson. Johnny drew Words close to his burnished cheek and watched the fire, mesmerized. He couldn’t imagine, even in his wildest dreams, that his first love, Sephra, was burning in the conflagration.

 

Sephra had waited for Johnny’s signal, but she hadn’t been able to make out the black-winged flag in the black of the night. She had pleaded with Words, who had flown round, “Get Johnny to wave the flag as fast as you can! They’ll put off setting fire to the place for a few more minutes…” But Words never mentioned this to Johnny.

 

Tomorrow morning, Johnny will weep in loud lamentation when he discovers the charred remains of his Sephra, his precipitate 17-year old love. Thus this tale of a young man, a young woman and a robin will end.

 

This is a heartbreaking story of how learning to speak is synonymous with learning to lie. Johnny did not know that this was precisely what Words had learned.

 

 



View Original Work ↓

View in the original format (.PDF document)

 

 また飛んでいる駒鳥が

ぼくが殺したはずなのに 

 

 

            1 

                     

   ジョニーという名の少年が、鳥と話ができるようになったことは、だれもしりませんで 

  した。でも、島の人たちは、いつも肩(かた)の上に一羽の駒鳥(こまどり)を乗せて歩いている半ズボンの少

  年ジョニーを見かけては、ほほえましく思ったものです。

   ジョニーは十七歳。背(せ)がすらりと高く、日に焼(や)けて、まるで鹿(しか)のように大股(おおまた)で歩く、黒 

  人との混血(こんけつ)のようなボクサータイプの男の子でした。

 

            2

 

   ジョニーが、鳥と話ができるようになった原因は自分でも知ることができませんでした。

  いったい、自分が鳥語(とりご)で話しているのか、それとも駒鳥が人間語(にんげんご)で話しているのか、その

 

  どっちでもない特別のことばがあるのか、ということさえ、はっきりしないのです。

   とこどき、「鳥と話をしている自分」を。外から観察してみたいと思うのですが、話し

  ているときは、つい夢中になっているので、われを忘れてしまって、その余裕がないので

  す。ただ、たしかなことは、自分と駒鳥とのあいだには、きちんとした会話が成り立つと

  いうことと、お互いが「無二(むに)の親友」だと思っている、ということでした。

   ジョニーは、駒鳥に「ことば」という名前をつけました。だから、これは、ジョニーと

  ことばの物語なのです。

 

            3

 

   島の図書館には、いろんな本がありました。言語に関するものだけでも、チベットやマ

  ダガスカル島などの原住民の言語の辞典から、犬語辞典(いぬごじてん)、コンサイス・キャット・ランゲ

  ―ジ、鏡文字解読書(かがみもじかいどくしょ)、月人会話百科(げつじんかいわひゃっか)、想像的天体語辞典、透明人間大言海、アリス悪口(あっこう)罵(ば)

  詈雑言集(りぞうごんしゅう)、改訂版(かいていばん)かもしか語辞典、逐語訳(ちくごやく)死者会話早わかり、のろい語全科、ハイエナ語(ご)

  独習(どくしゅう)三週間、胎児原言語辞典、卵(ハンプテイ・)男(ダンプテイ)の名言集などなど、書架(しょか)いっぱいになるほどで

  す。

   でも、なぜか鳥のことばに関するものだけは一冊もありませんでした。 

 

   それで、鳥と話ができる人間というのは、島中で(いいえ、世界中でも)ジョニーがた

  った一人だった、というわけなのでした。

 

            4

 

  「島のことばでは……」

   と、駒鳥は言いました。

  「腕のことは、人間の枝って言うんだよ。肩は止まり木で、足は動きまわる根のことなん

  だ」

   ジョニーは、笑い出しました。

  「人間のことばでは、鳥は、乗れない飛行機ってことになるんだがな」

   と、ジョニーが言うと、ことばは、

  「鳥のことばでは、飛行機はいちばん大きな鳥なんだ」

   と言いかえしました。

  「鳥のことばでは、木は叔父(おじ)さんで、木こりは死刑執行人(しけいしっこうにん)。鳥籠(とりかご)は強制収容所で、もじゃ

  もじゃ髪の頭は安下宿(やすげしゅく)ってことになる。手紙は木の葉に書き、風は郵便配達人(ゆうびんはいたつにん)」

  「なるほどなるほど」

   とジョニーは言いました。

  「そして歌のうまい鳥は、森の歌手ってことになるわけだね」

  「そうそう」

   と、ことばは言いました。

  「年とった鳥はオペラのように気どった囀(さえず)り方をするけど、若い鳥はみんな、気ままに啼(な)

  いたり、枝をゆすぶったりして、好き勝手に啼くのさ。もう、ピーチクと囀るひばりなん

  て、一羽もいないんだよ」

 

            5

 

   その頃、ジョニーには恋人がいました。彼女は、領事館(りょうじかん)の総督(そうとく)のお嬢さんで、名前をセ

  フラといいました。

   セフラは、ブロンドの長い髪を肩までたらした、昔気質(かたぎ)の古風な女の子で、いつも籠(かご)い

  っぱいの花をかたわらに置いて、ブロンテの恋愛小説を読んだり、ぬり絵をしたり、自動(じどう)

  人形(にんぎょう)に左手のセレナーデを演奏させたり、不思議の国への入り口をさがして一日中、鏡と

  にらめっこをしていたりするのでした。

   セフラは、一度、この世でいちばん短い歌をつくって、それをジョニーに歌ってきかせ

 

  てくれたことがありますが、それは、「あ」ではじまって「い」で終わる、無伴奏(むばんそう)の歌で

  した。

  「あ」と「い」のあいだにはなにもなかったので、つづけて少しのばして歌うと「アーイ

  ー」となるのですが、なにしろこの世でいちばん短い歌なので、のばしたりせずにひと息

  に歌わなければならず、そうすると「あい」と、なるのでした。ジョニーは、セフラに、

  この歌を三べんきかしてもらって、セフラを愛するようになりました。

   ジョニーとセフラは、領事館の中庭の、熱帯植物(ねったいしょくぶつ)の密生(みっせい)した白亜(はくあ)の壁(かべ)にもたれて、一日

  中、たあいのないことを話しながらすごすのが、とても好きでした。

   たとえば、かたつむりの渦(うず)は、右まきか左巻きか? 六角形の星もありうるかどうか?

  キスするとき、もし片目をあけるとしたら、右目がいいか左目がいいか? 世界でいちば

  ん遠い場所は、いったいどこだと思うか? 夢の中で忘れものをした場合、それをどうや

  って取り戻してくるか? 世界中に、愛ということばは何種類あるか?

   そして、二人が語りあっているあいだ、駒鳥のことばは、ジョニーの肩に止まって(と

  きどきうなずいたりしながら)とてもしあわせそうに、いっしょにいるのでした。

 

                                       6

 

  「ねえ、きみはセフラをどう思う?」

   ときくと、

  「とてもかわいいと思うよ」

   と、ことばは答えました。

  「もし、きみが駒鳥なんかじゃなかったら、恋人にしたいと思うかい?」

   ことばはちょっと考えてから、

  「とてもかわいいけど」

   と言いました。

  「そこまでは、いかないね」

  「へえ。どうしてだい?」

   と、ジョニーはききました。

  「ちょっと子供っぽすぎると思うんだ。ぼくは、もう少し大人っぽいほうが好きなのさ。

  もっと高く飛べる鳥が、ね」

  「生意気(なまいき)言ってるぞ、駒鳥のくせに」

   と、ジョニーは笑いながら言いました。でも、ジョニーには、ことばの本心はわかって

  いませんでした。

   ことばは、ほんとうは、こう言いたかったのです。

  「セフラも悪くはないけど、ぼくはジョニーのほうがもっと好きだ。ジョニーを、だれに

  も奪(と)られたくないのだ」と。

 

            7

 

   一人の少年と、一人の少女と、一羽の駒鳥と。島では、その仲(なか)の良(よ)さが評判になりまし

  た。

   彼らは、いつも日だまりの森や領事館の中庭の芝生(しばふ)の上で、とりとめもない会話をくり

  かえしていました。マーマレードという名の猫に眉毛(まゆげ)があるという話。帽子屋(ぼうしや)の双生児(そうせいじ)の

  オシッコの長さも同じだという話。島でいちばん正確な二等辺三角形は領事館の書記官(しょきかん)の

  鼻の形だという話。眠りねずみとけむりねずみのロマンスの話。七歳のキャロルが、自分

  でも知らずにコーカス・レースで編(あ)んだ宝島の地図の話。

   ときどきセフラは、歌をつくってジョニーにきかせてくれるのでした。

 

    けむりのペンで

    けむりの紙に

    書いたけむりのラブレター

 

    読まないうちに消えちゃった

 

            8

 

   でも、しあわせな話は長くつづかないものです。一年もたたないうちに、セフラはジョ

  ニーに悲しい知らせを告(つ)げなければならなくなったのです。

  「ねえ、ジョニー」

   と、セフラがあらたまって言いました。

  「あたしたち、急にこの島を去らなきゃならなくなったんです」

  「えっ!」

   と、おどろいてジョニーはききかえしました(駒鳥のことばが百回まばたきをするあい

  だの出来事です)。

  「どうしてだい?」

   セフラは答えました。

  「島の領事館が閉鎖(へいさ)されることになったんです。それで、あたしたち一家はそろって隣(となり)の

  島へ引越(ひっこ)しすることになりました」

   ジョニーは、信じられないという表情で首をふりました。

  「それで、きみはぼくたちをおいて、一人だけ行ってしまうのかい?」

  「仕方がないわ」

   と、セフラは言いました。

  「あたしは行きたくないけど、これはもう決まってしまったことなんです」

  「セフラ!」

   とジョニーは大声を出しました。

  「そんな命令なんか、きくことはない。きみだけ、島に残るんだ!」  

   セフラは悲しそうに首をふりました。

  「できないわ。もうお父様が荷造りもすませてしまったのです。政府からの緊急指令(きんきゅうしれい)で、

  引越しは明日しなければなりません」

 

            9

 

   領事館の引越しの夜は月蝕(げっしょく)でした。島はトラホームにかかったように赤い空に照(て)らし出

  され、あわただしく何台もの馬車が荷物を運び出しました。戦争がはじまるかも知れない、

  という噂(うわさ)が島中につたわっていました。

   ジョニーは、セフラをさらってでも、駒鳥といっしょに、「もうひとつの島」へ逃げて

  いっしょに暮らそうと考えました。もう、別れて暮らすことなんか、できる自信がなかっ

  たからです。

   駒鳥のことばがジョニーの伝言をつたえました。みんなが出て行ってしまうまで、領事

  館に残っていること、そしてぼくが迎(むか)えに行くまでかくれていなさい、という伝言です。

   引越しは、まるで戦争の前夜のようでした。そして、総督の家族はそれぞれの馬車に自

  分の荷物をつませて、岬(みさき)の船着場まで出て行きました。トランプでいえば、クローバーの

  ジャックのように生真面目(きまじめ)な引越し監督のツマロー中尉が大声で叫びました。

  「さあ、みなさん。早く出てください。だれもいなくなったら、邸宅(やしき)に火をつけます!」

 

            10

 

   ジョニーは、合図(あいず)の黒い翼(つばさ)の旗(はた)をふりました。それがふられたら、裏口から出て、ジョ

  ニーの待たせてある馬車で、岬と反対の入江(いりえ)まで行き、そこから船を出して別の島へ行く

  という計画です。邸宅のまわりには放火用(ほうかよう)の枯芝(かれしば)が山とつまれました。

  「もう、だれも残っていませんか?」

   と、ツマロー中尉が大声で呼びました。

  「ねえ、ジョニー」

   と、駒鳥のことばは言いました。

  「セフラをつれて行くのは無理だよ。ぼくたちだけで、今まで通り楽しく暮らそうよ」

  「いやだ」

   とジョニーは首をふりました。

  「ぼくはセフラといっしょじゃなきゃ、いやなんだ」

 

  「もう、だれも残っていないなら、作業(さぎょう)にとりかかります」

   と、ツマロー中尉の最後の予告の声が、メガフォンから流れました。大あわてで、門番

  と、眠りぐせの怠(なま)け猫が飛び出してきました。

  「これで最後だ! もうだれもいないよ!」

   と言いながら。

 

   ジョニーは駒鳥のことばに、念のためセフラが、たしかに裏口から出たかどうかをたし

  かめに行ってくるように、頼みました。駒鳥のことばは飛んでゆき、ひとまわりしてすぐ

  帰ってきました。

  「大丈夫だよ」

  とことばは言いました。

  「とても心細そうな顔をして、裏口の外に一人で立っているよ」

   そう言う駒鳥のことばの表情が、どことなく悲しそうだったのにジョニーは気がつきま

  せんでした。

  「そうかい?」

   とジョニーは言いました。

  「それじゃ、領事館の最後の、思い出を焼き捨てる火事を見てから出発しよう」

 

            11

 

   やがて邸宅に火は放たれました。火は見る見るうちに燃(も)えひろがり、空まで真赤に照ら

  し出しました。ジョニーは、燃ゆる頬(ほお)に駒鳥のことばを抱(だ)きよせて、うっとりとその火を

  見ていました。

   でも、その火の中で、はじめての恋人のセフラが焼かれていることなど、夢にも知らな

  かったのです。

   セフラは、ジョニーの合図の黒い翼の旗を持っていましたが、黒い夜に黒い翼の旗は、

  まったく見わけがつきませんでした。そこへ飛んできた駒鳥のことばに、

  「早く旗をふってちょうだい! 火を放(はな)つのは、もう少しあとにするように」

   と頼んだのに、駒鳥のことばは、そのことをジョニーには言わなかったのでした。

   だぶん、あくる朝に、ジョニーはセフラの(そして、早すぎた十七歳の恋の)なきがら(、、、、)

  が黒焦(くろこ)げになっているのを発見して号泣(ごうきゅう)することでしょう。そして一羽の駒鳥と少年と少

  女の物語は終わりとなるのです。

   みなさん。これは、ことばを覚(おぼ)えるのと、うそをつくことを覚えるのは、同じことだと

  いう悲しいお話です。ジョニーは、駒鳥がことばといっしょに、うそをつくことも覚えた

  ということを知らなかったのでした。

 

 

 

 

 

 

赤糸で縫いとじられた物語

寺山修司

2000年4月18日第一刷発行

角川春樹

 

 

頁百十三から百二十七抜粋

 

Translator Notes

This story is taken from Terayama Shūji’s collection of short stories entitled, 赤糸で縫いとじられた物語 (literally, “tales sewn together with a red thread”), which I have rendered into English as The Crimson Thread of Abandon and will be published by MerwinAsia in September 2013. All the stories in this collection can be enjoyed independently; but at the same time, they are loosely sewn together, as the title suggests, by direct or oblique references to characters or content of other stories in the collection.  The link between stories are at times tenuous, reminiscent of Cloud Atlas, in that the reader discovers that a particular aspect of one story has significance for the characters in another story. 

The author describes the stories as “fairy tales for adults” in which he employs the construct of the fairy tale but directs the narrative to an adult audience, eschewing the conventional didactic nature of a fairy tale for children. As the translator, I have tried to maintain his voice as storyteller, keeping the English fairly spare and forthright.  The most formidable challenge of this text resides in Terayama’s penchant for wordplay and literary reference both common and arcane, Western and Japanese.  The text often brims with Japanese puns, double entendre, and onomatopoetic euphony. Where possible, I have rendered the Japanese into the crucible of English and let it take its own form and effect. When the Japanese and English do not coincide with equivalent effect, I have employed either the technique of modulation or resorted to adaptation to elucidate the text.


Elizabeth Armstrong

×