Far from Folsom Prison
That's where I want to stay
And I'd let that lonesome whistle
Blow my blues away

 

—Johnny Cash

 

I fell for Molly when I was just fifteen, and she an older woman and all. Anyone’ll tell you I ain’t the type to chicken out over somethin like that. She was just standin there on the stairs of her daddy’s store, right up next to Sammy’s gas station. Long and narrow it was, just a coupla feet square, all shelves and a Frigidaire, and a small counter on your right soon’s you walk in, register on one end and his face glued right over it. Sold anythin and everythin you can imagine: cigarettes, Coca-Colas, Playboy magazines stashed under the counter, even ammo and mouse guns if you came with someone’s seal of approval. Supposin you were in on the game, you’d make the rounds of the store, grab two bags of chips, put em in your basket and ask for some pipe tobacco. “I come for them goods I ordered, sir, two pouches pipe tobacco, menthol please”—that’s what you’d say, see? He’d give you the once over, head to toe, with  those watery eyes, and only then he’d hand it over, once he was certain you were clean and not gonna rat him out to the police. We’re talkin a whole song and dance. As if y’all back then didn’t know who was workin dirty deals in Sacramento. He’d lock the door and walk you to the chicken coop next to the shack out back. Ha! Now that was a shit—for-brains hiding place—pardon my French—but what do you expect from someone like that? He’d boot the air with his dirty shit-kickers to scare off the chickens and then yank open the hatch with a frayed noose. And what awful sorry goods they were: near always a buncha second-hand junk in desperate need of TLC, and I mean a good two days of re-sus-citation, oiling the whole thing up, cleaning out the chamber, getting the spur and hammer all prim and proper. And you better believe that if you wanted to lay eyes on a gun like that, god-awful though it was, first you had to show him your greenbacks. No wise cracks, no foolin around. You’da been drilled on the how-tos beforehand, see? Lips sealed till you slid that gun in back of your belt and let it rest icy cold on your tail. Then, beat it outta there with your heart in your mouth. We were just young’ins back then, not a hair on our chins. Saps playin at being superheroes. Still tied to our mommas’ apron strings but rarin to be part of somethin, big men round town. So we needed the bastard, see? Do it all legit with IDs and permits and all those lawyer papers—no way in hell we’da gotten ourselves a piece that way. No way in hell. And we were real jazzed up, you know, not a one of us was gonna wait five or six years to hold steel in our hands. My pals, Miles and Toothpick Carl, told me the fella was real ornery, never gave a guy a break. Gotta have exactly the right number of bills ready to take out of your pocket, crisp and new. Goddamn, man! It was so long ago, and I still get madder than a wet hen when I get to rememberin his fool face and his filthy old wife-beater, drippin with sweat in the summer and stinkin like skunk.

 

Truth be told, yours truly stepped into that store one time and one time only, and that was before I got an eyeful of Molly. Saved my dollars, wasn’t that I hadn’t got the money, see, only I had my heart set on a little second-hand Berretta I knew came in around then, but I just wasn’t gonna go in there. Wanna know why? Maybe I was being hard-headed, proud, a fool, but what I surely didn’t want was for Molly’s old man to find out about me and the gang. Deep down I was a romantic, sappy fool, see? Even had a pompadour back then—ha! It’s true, you know, full on, pomaded and all—kinda like yours but bigger. Where’s all that hair now, huh? All in all, I got two tufts left and they’re white to boot. Goddammit! Fuckin old age! Kept my distance and my eye on the store and didn’t walk through that door, even though, I gotta tell you, it burned me bad that I didn’t have a gun. You sonuvabitch, I’d tell myself, you gonna go in there one day to ask for her hand and you want her daddy knowin about what you foolin around with? Thinkin you’re a gangster? Best keep clean and watch youself around here. Be a real gent, a prince, a straight shooter. Soon’s I got near that place, it was no holds barred, run spit through my eyebrows, fingers through my hair, straighten my shirt, act highfalutin, all that song and dance so’s her daddy wouldn’t get a load of what I was into and form a prejudice against me. All for my baby’s sake, see? And mark my words, I kept that promise I made myself back then. Kept clear of him, I swear, ain’t gone within ten feet of him. Exactly as I’m sayin, not even once. But as luck would have it, I didn’t stay clear of Molly when I should’ve. Like I knew what I was doin back then. The kind of thing you end up payin for all your life. It don’t take much to figure that I got her pregnant faster than green grass through a goose, just two months before she blew out seventeen candles on the cake her mama baked her. The night of her birthday she was waitin for me in front of the gas station. We planned it beforehand. Soon’s the kinfolk and friends gone and her daddy’s snorin like a broken whistle, she come out the gate holdin a bag with some clothes and pork sandwiches wrapped for the road. I signaled to her with my headlights. Stepped on it soon’s we got to the highway; cut out with a car I’d stole that afternoon from Mitch’s yard, an old jalopy so nobody’d fuss. I was shiverin from the cold, but warmed up real fast. It was like a dream at first. My baby and me, all on our lonesome. Goddamn, it was good…. We drove nights and soon’s the sun come up we’d hide the car in a field and sleep on the flowers. I was headin west to my Uncle Jacob’s in Nashville. I knew he was the only one who’d stick by us and I was right. Howdy, Uncle Jacob, big guy, I said soon’s he agreed to let us stay, you’re a real treasure… We stayed a while so’s the first storm clouds blew over, and the whole thing got forgot some… and then…

 

Got another smoke? Light it for me, will ya? Alright then, pal. I took you for a ride startin this story at the very beginnin and I reckon I’ve just about tired you out. You wanna catch a few winks, ain’t no problem with me. No, really, it’s ok. I’ll talk to you later, give you a shake. Got the whole night in front of us, all the long night, so lean back, take a load off… 

 

And that’s how it come to pass, as God is my witness. When I heard about Johnny Cash’s concert, I’d been behind bars for two years and it was eatin me up good. Back then I was at Folsom in California. You been there? That’s alright, you ain’t missin nothin. I was in Level II Security—all us Level IIs got transferred here in oh-four. I worshipped Johnny like some worship God long before I shot Molly’s daddy and got myself locked up. Ring of fire, I walk the line, you know em, son? If I had a penny for each time I sung “As sure as night is dark and day is light/ I keep you on my mind both day and night/And happiness I’ve known proves that it’s right/ Because you’re mine, I walk the line” to my little woman and she be lookin at me as if the happiness of that moment would last forever. Each mornin, I’d wake in that cell, wash my face, brush my teeth and do my exercises—I never forgot to exercise, never, not a single day durin those early years. Wanted to be ready for my release, see? Still believed that the mornin would come, you know, like the one that’s comin soon, when they’d throw the doors wide open and let me go home to my wife and child, cause the wool’d finally come off that judge’s eyes and he’d see clear as day that I hadn’t meant to kill the bastard, that there was nothin I could do, cause if you think about it—and this is between us now—there was no other choice I could’ve made. May I ask you somethin? What would you’da done in my place? I know it don’t mean nothin now, and you ain’t obliged to answer, but I ask you, pal: what would you’da done? Got back sudden one mornin from the field cause I’d hurt my hand in the machine and saw his car parked in front of the farmhouse. I froze. Couldn’t even see straight. So many months gone, couldn’t believe the bastard found us. “He got four other kids, won’t even look for us, forget it,” is what my little woman said and as the days passed by I believed her more and more. I ran like a hellhound on my trail. Flew up those steps and stopped in front of Molly’s room, heard her cryin and hollerin and beggin for mercy. I burst through the door and saw him drippin with sweat and ugly as sin, ugly as I remembered him, kickin her in the ribs with his muddy boots. Same boots he kicked the chickens with, that dirtbag. I was sick to my stomach, man. His oily hair hangin over his face. Crazy as a peach orchard boar. Blood runnin down Molly’s legs as she lay there. “Bastard, you’re a dead man!” I hollered before jumpin him. Grabbed him by the throat. I couldn’t feel a thing, no pain, no nothin. But he weren’t an easy man to knock down. He was still young, you know, and big, and there was no way this side of hell I was gonna drop that bastard. Bit him crazy hard on the arm, but he got me in a grip and throwed me to the wall and I ain’t even realized how…

 

You hear me?  You listenin?  C’mon, man, I’m talkin to you…

 

So I was tellin you how he throwed me… I was fast, so I got away from him like this, slipped behind him and shoved him hard just when my baby was startin to lose her senses. By the time he got back on his feet, I’d pulled the little Berretta out the holster and was pointin it at him, all shaky-like. The gun I’d been mooning over was a gift for the road from Toothpick: “Take it, you monkey, so’s nobody bothers you none,” I remember him sayin to me the afternoon we cut out. Funny thing is he bought that Berretta from Molly’s daddy, from his two-bit shabby store. He stood up, straightened hisself out, and looked at me with his bat-shit crazy eyes. And then, as if I weren’t in front of him, as if he couldn’t even see me, he spat and went back to kickin Molly who was twitchin on the floor. That’s when I snapped. Simple as that, can’t say nothin else. Took a deep breath and aimed, had that gun in a two-hand death grip. Saw red, bud. See how it was? Saw red, pure and simple. Mashed that trigger without even thinkin bout it. Easy as pie to kill someone, you can’t even imagine how easy. Got him in the head with the first shot and then emptied the cylinder in his chest: bam, bam, bam! He fell and just lay there, not movin at all, not like when the hero dies in the movies. His blood mixed in with Molly’s on the floor. I took my baby in my arms and ran to my uncle’s car. Knew I had nobody to look out for, and drove into town like Satan was at the wheel. Our child was saved at the very last minute, pal, at the eleventh hour. At the hospital, a little before the doctor told me the good news, three police run in and handcuffed me. Through the open door I saw my Molly in bed, safe and sound asleep. As they dragged me to the police car I was singin, I felt free, didn’t have a care in the world, didn’t even try to resist. Because you’re mine, I walk the line. Man, Johnny, if you only knew.

 

You asleep? No? You wanna get some shut-eye, well then get some, told you so earlier. Ain’t sleepy? Ok. Gimme a smoke. So I ask you: What would you’da done in my place? Yeah, now that I told you about it, what would you’da done? Wouldn’t you’da put him six feet under, too? Yeah, go on, tell me…

 

Thirteenth of January, 1968, that’s a day I ain’t never gonna forget. Hadn’t closed my eyes all night waitin for the concert. Before killin three people in an armed robbery, my cellmate Tony Simansky’d worked as a soundman with Johnny on his first concert. Life is crazy, you know? We were as happy as a coupla pine borers in a fresh log. For days on end we tried out songs, dusted off lyrics. Partners in crime. Hey, listen to this one, get a load of that one—you know how it goes. A few days before Johnny’s due at the prison I told Tony I wrote a song special for the occasion—a song straight outta my soul, somethin stone-cold real. With a chorus, music and all. Begged him to tell me what he thought. He read the lyrics and asked me to drum out the beat with my hands. Tears runnin down his face, Tony throwed his arms round me, kissed me, and swore he’d move heaven and earth to get that song to Johnny. Got the warden’s permission to record the song on an old one-deck recorder they sent up from Sacramento and we taped it. Couldn’t barely scratch out a tune on the guitar, but I knew a coupla chords and someway somehow got it to sound decent. Tony made some calls, he still knew people in the music business. And then we waited for the day of the concert, not holdin out much hope, truth be told. To pass the time, he told me stories about Johnny, stories I didn’t know and that marked me deep: bout the brother he lost when he was just a young’in, bout how tough his life been in the cotton-fields. Y’all got it easy now. Back then there weren’t nothin. You got a parcel of land and you broke your back and worked your fingers to the bone to scrape together a livin. Hard times, you know, real hard, not like nowadays. Even prison is a piece of cake in comparison to how we had it. Mornin before the concert we got a call from the warden’s office. Hustled our asses over right quick. The guard Perkins, a cool cat who’d taken a likin to me, told us Mr. Cash’s manager telephoned from the hotel cause he wanted to use the song in the concert and if we were agreeable we had to sign some papers. Started cryin just like a baby, pal, and I ain’t cried even on the day when I first set eyes on Molly and our child in the waiting room. If all went well, Cash wanted to use the song in the album he was aimin to bring out later. Can’t say I sweated over it too much—you bet your ass I said yes! Early afternoon the next day, we all showered on the double and got gussied up in our Sunday best. They told us to watch ourselves and be on our best behavior, and then took us down to the cafeteria in groups of ten. We looked up at all them instruments settin on the stage, the drums and the microphones, and it was as if we was born again, as if we might start from the beginnin. Who’d believe a thing like that: a concert just for us in that place? So many years gone and nobody done nothin just for us, nothin to soothe our souls. Years and years we’d been forgotten, garbage tossed behind those cement walls, we were more dead than alive. You know what it’s like to have nobody give a fuck about you? Weren’t expecting nothin and then this, a concert out of the blue…

 

Johnny come out on that rinky-dink stage and greeted us with that cowboy voice of his, “Hello, I’m Johnny Cash,” he said, like he always did at his concerts. I was standin in the middle of that hall but it sure felt like I was floatin in seventh heaven. I ain’t never abused no substances, cross my heart and hope to die, and I don’t smoke nothin other’n  tobacco. But that night I swear on my mama’s grave that my body been possessed by somethin greater than myself—somethin with a power over me, like some kinda drug. I sang along to all the songs, listened to every word—both the jokin’ and the serious—he said on the breaks. Each and every word I heard made me stronger, each and every song, greater. And I found the strength to keep goin. Started to see my life through Johnny’s music and lyrics. Watched him up there on stage and he was like one of the fellas in the old gang, exceptin that he’d made it instead of landin in the shit, and God had given him the gift of writin songs for all of us. When he said he was gonna sing my song, you can imagine what happened, the hall near came down. The fellas next to me, they took me in their arms and lifted me high. To this very day, when I close my eyes, I remember the ruckus in that cafeteria, the whistles, the clappin, the beatin of my heart, swellin with joy till I near burst with it. Sure nough, he’d made it his own, cause he’s the boss, and no matter he ain’t had time to run through it too much, it was out of this world. Just a handful of moments in life that sear themselves in your mind, pal, important moments: the sound of that Berretta, Johnny’s voice that January of sixty-eight. Those are surely mine.  

 

I gone and tired you out again. I can see you’re bored. Okay, pal. Just one last thing I’m gonna tell you. When I walked outta that cafeteria, I had faith in myself again, cause I always believed that deep inside I ain’t all bad. Just that I was unlucky and got punished for somethin that I couldn’ta left undone. Don’t know if you understand.

 

Hey, you listenin? Looks like dawn’s breakin out there. If you take a look-see from here, you can just about make out the haze on the horizon. A new day. Shake youself out and gulp down some coffee cause the phone’ll start ringin and if they hear that croak in your voice they’ll be onto you. So what? So you got a little shut-eye, it’s a cryin shame to be called out onto the carpet for it… You been good company, pal. I thank you for puttin up with my palaverin. Truly. It’s been a while since I talked to anybody. If I could, I’d pay you back somehow, but it don’t look likely. Any case, I’m ready, so don’t you worry none. Washed my face, got all gussied up, I’m all ready. It’s a new day out there—take a look outside. My wife and daughter and her little one will be waitin there for me… Now, ain’t that a treat… That’s the one thing for sure: They’ll be right up by the glass window. It’s been weeks since they been here, but I’m not harborin any hard feelins, truth be told, they just got tired, like everyone else. There you go, the phone’s ringin, didn’t I tell you, pal, didn’t I? Cough it out, go on, they’ll get wise to you. What’s that they’re sayin? Time to go? I’m ready, you know, don’t you worry yourself none. I’m ready.

 



View Original Work ↓

 

Far from Folsom Prison

That’s where I want to stay

And I’d let that lonesome whistle

Blow my blues away

 

—Johnny Cash

Ερωτεύτηκα τη Μόλι στα δεκαπέντε μου κι ας ήταν πιο μεγάλη. Δεν κώλωνα εγώ μ’ αυτά, όλοι το ξέρανε στην πιάτσα. Στεκόταν στα σκαλιά του μίνι μάρκετ που είχε ο πατέρας της κολλητά στο βενζινάδικο του Σάμι, ένα μαγαζάκι λίγα τετραγωνικά, μακρόστενο, γεμάτο ράφια μ’ ένα ψυγείο κι ένα μικρό πάγκο μόλις έμπαινες στα δεξιά, τη μηχανή στην άκρη και πίσω της χαλκομανία τη φάτσα του. Πουλούσε ό,τι μπορούσες να βάλεις με το νου σου, από τσιγάρα, κόκα κόλες και περιοδικά PLAYBOY που τα ‘κρυβε κάτω από τον πάγκο του, μέχρι σφαίρες και μικρά όπλα αν πήγαινες με σύσταση. Έτσι και ήσουνα στο κόλπο, έπρεπε να γυροφέρεις το μαγαζί, να βάλεις στο καλάθι δυο πακέτα τσιπς και να ζητήσεις καπνό για πίπα. «Έχω έρθει για την παραγγελία, κύριε, δυο πακέτα απ’ τον καπνό για πίπα, μεντόλ παρακαλώ», να τι έπρεπε να πεις. Σε κοίταγε απ’ την κορφή ως τα νύχια με κείνο το υγρό βλέμμα του και μόνο τότε σου έδινε, αν ήτανε σίγουρος πως ήσουνα καθαρός και δεν κινδύνευε να τον δώσεις στους μπάτσους. Αστεία πράγματα δηλαδή. Λες κι οι δικοί σου δεν ξέρανε ποιος έκανε τις βρωμοδουλειές στο Σακραμέντο. Κλείδωνε την πόρτα και περπατούσε μαζί σου μέχρι το κοτέτσι της πίσω παράγκας. Χα! Κρυψώνα του κώλου ‒συγχώρα τη γλώσσα μου‒ αλλά τι να περιμένεις από δαύτον. Έριχνε μια κλοτσιά στον αέρα με τα βρωμοπάπουτσα να σκορπίσουνε οι κότες και τράβαγε την καταπακτή από μια τρίχινη θηλιά. Το εμπόρευμα ήτανε να το κλαίνε οι ρέγγες, συνήθως μεταχειρισμένο και ήθελε μια γερή δόση συντήρησης, ν’ ασχοληθείς δηλαδή μαζί του καμιά δυο μέρες μέχρι να το φέρεις σε καλή κατάσταση με τα λάδια του, την καθαρή του τη θαλάμη, τον κόκορα όμορφα στη θέση του. Και μη νομίζεις, ακόμα κι αυτό το άθλιο πιστολάκι το έβλεπες μόνο αν έδειχνες κι εσύ το μετρητό επί τόπου. Ούτε εξυπνάδες, ούτε πολλά πολλά. Ήσουνα δασκαλεμένος από πριν για τις διαδικασίες. Στα μουγκά μέχρι να περάσεις το όπλο μέσα στη ζώνη πάνω απ’ τον κώλο σου, να το νιώσεις παγωμένο στην ουρά σου. Μετά την έκανες με την ψυχή στο στόμα. Αμούστακα παιδάκια ήμασταν τότε, άλλωστε. Χέστες που το παίζανε ανίκητοι. Μόλις που είχαμε βγει απ’ το αυγό και θέλαμε συμμορίες και τα τοιαύτα. Αλλά τον είχαμε ανάγκη τον μπάσταρδο. Επίσημα με ταυτότητες, άδειες και όλα τα νόμιμα χαρτιά, το πράμα δεν υπήρχε περίπτωση να το πάρουμε ποτέ. Πο-τέ. Και το αίμα έβραζε μιλάμε, κανένας δεν ήθελε να περιμένει πέντε έξι χρόνια μέχρι να κρατήσει στα χέρια του σιδερικό. Από τα δυο μου φιλαράκια, τον Μάιλς και τον Καρλ τον Οδοντογλυφίδα, ήξερα πως ο τύπος ήτανε σκέτο καθίκι και δεν καταλάβαινε από παζάρια. Το πρασινάκι έπρεπε να βγει επιτόπου από την τσέπη κολλαριστό και μετρημένο. Διάολε! Πάω τόσα χρόνια πίσω και μου ανεβαίνει το αίμα στο κεφάλι μόνο που θυμάμαι την ηλίθια φάτσα του κι εκείνη τη θεοβρώμικη τιραντένια φανέλα που έσταζε ιδρώτες τα καλοκαίρια και βρώμαγε σαν ασβός…

Να σου πω την αλήθεια, εμένα που με βλέπεις μόνο μια φορά μπήκα στο μικρό μάρκετ κι αυτό πριν δω τη Μόλι. Τα ‘χα μαζέψει κι εγώ τα δολαριάκια μου, δεν ήταν πως δεν τα ‘χα μαζέψει, είχα ζαχαρώσει και μια μικρή μεταχειρισμένη μπερέτα που ήξερα πως είχε φέρει εκείνο τον καιρό αλλά μέσα δεν έμπαινα. Παραξενεύεσαι, έτσι; Πες το ξεροκεφαλιά, περηφάνια, βλακεία, όμως δεν ήθελα με τίποτα ο πατέρας της Μόλι να ξέρει για μένα και τη συμμορία. Βλέπεις κατά βάθος ήμουνα κι εγώ ρομαντικός και αφελής, τρελόπαιδο. Είχα και κοκοράκι τότε, χα, ναι σου λέω, κανονικό με μπριγιαντίνη, σαν το δικό σου και μεγαλύτερο. Τώρα που ‘ν’ τα μαλλάκια μου; Για δες, δυο τούφες μείνανε κι αυτές άσπρες. Άσ’ τα να πάνε. Γαμημένα γεράματα. Καθόμουνα μακριά και κοίταγα, αλλά την πόρτα δεν την πέρναγα και μ’ έκαιγε, να ξέρεις, που δεν είχα όπλο. Ρε μαλάκα, μουρμούραγα μέσα από τα δόντια, μια μέρα θα μπεις να τη ζητήσεις, θες ο πατέρας της να ξέρει τι είσαι και τι κάνεις; Να σε πει αλήτη; Τραβήξου, ρε, έλεγα στον εαυτό μου, εδώ τριγύρω θα είσαι πάντα στην τρίχα. Κύριος κανονικός, πρίγκιπας, κούτελο καθαρό. Με το που έμπαινα, λοιπόν, στη γειτονιά έκανα τα δέοντα, ίσιαζα τα μαλλιά μου, τράβαγα το πουλόβερ μου κάτω, κορδωνόμουνα σαν λόρδος, σάλιωνα τα φρύδια μου κι όλα αυτά τα γελοία μήπως και με δει ο τύπος που ζύγωνα και με πάρει από κακό μάτι… Τέλος πάντων, ήτανε το μωρό μου στη μέση, γι’ αυτό. Και, όπως σ’ τα ‘πα, την υπόσχεσή που έδωσα στον εαυτό μου την κράτησα τότε. Απ’ αυτόν κατάφερα να τραβηχτώ, τ’ ορκίζομαι, δεν τον είχα πλησιάσει στα πέντε μέτρα. Όπως ακριβώς σ’ το λέω, ούτε μια φορά. Αλλά δυστυχώς δεν τραβήχτηκα κι απ’ τη Μόλι την ώρα που έπρεπε… Μήπως είχα και μυαλό τότε; Αυτά πληρώνεις μια ζωή. Όπως καταλαβαίνεις, της σκάρωσα το παιδάκι στο πι και φι δυο μήνες πριν φυσήξει τα δεκαεφτά κεράκια στη τούρτα της μάνας της. Το βράδυ των γενεθλίων με περίμενε μπροστά απ’ το βενζινάδικο. Τα ‘χαμε κανονίσει κάτι μέρες πριν. Μόλις φύγανε συγγενείς και φίλοι κι ο πατέρας της άρχισε να ροχαλίζει σαν χαλασμένη τσαγιέρα, βγήκε από το φράχτη κρατώντας μια σακούλα με λίγα ρούχα και σάντουιτς χοιρινού τυλιγμένα για το δρόμο. Της έκανα σινιάλο παίζοντας τα φώτα. Βγήκαμε γκαζωμένοι στη μεγάλη δημοσιά, το σκάσαμε με το αυτοκίνητο που είχα κλέψει το ίδιο απόγευμα από τη μάντρα του Μιτς, μια σακαράκα ήτανε που δεν θα έλειπε από κανέναν. Έτρεμα από το κρύο, αλλά συνήθισα γρήγορα. Ήτανε όνειρο στην αρχή. Εγώ και το μωρό μου, μόνοι μας, Χριστέ μου, ήτανε πράγματι ωραία… Οδηγούσαμε νύχτα και το πρωί κρύβαμε το αμάξι σε κάποια ανοιχτωσιά και κοιμόμασταν σε παρτέρια. Είχα πάρει ρότα δυτικά να βρω τον θείο μου τον Τζέικομπ στο Νάσβιλ. Πίστευα πως μόνο αυτός θα μας καταλάβαινε και είχα δίκιο. Γειά σου, ρε θείε Τζέικομπ, γίγαντα, του είπα μόλις συμφώνησε να μας δεχτεί, είσαι σκέτος θησαυρός… Μείναμε λίγο στη φάρμα του μέχρι να περάσει η πρώτη μπόρα, να ξεχαστεί λίγο το πράγμα… Μετά…


Έχεις άλλο τσιγάρο; Μου ανάβεις ένα; Εντάξει, φίλε. Τα ‘χω πάρει πολύ από την αρχή και μου φαίνεται πως σ’ έχω κουράσει. Κι αν θες να κοιμηθείς και λίγο, κανένα πρόβλημα. Όχι, αλήθεια, από μένα εντάξει. Θα σου μιλήσω εγώ αργότερα, θα σε σκουντήξω. Έχουμε μπροστά μας ολόκληρο βράδυ, γείρε λίγο, ξεκουράσου…


…Έτσι είχαν τα πράγματα κι ας είναι μάρτυς μου ο Κύριος. Όταν έμαθα για τη συναυλία του Τζόνι Κας, ήμουνα ήδη δυο χρόνια πίσω από τα κάγκελα κι είχε αρχίσει να με παίρνει από κάτω. Τότε έκανα στη φυλακή του Φόλσομ στην Καλιφόρνια. Έχεις περάσει από κει; Καλύτερα, δε χάνεις τίποτα. Ήμουνα στο επίπεδο ασφαλείας 2 κι όλοι που ανήκαμε σ’ αυτή την κατηγορία μεταφερθήκαμε εδώ το 2004. Τον Τζόνι τον λάτρευα σαν θεό αρκετό καιρό πριν πυροβολήσω τον πατέρα της Μόλι και με πάρουνε μέσα. Ring of fire, I walk the line, τα ξέρεις αυτά, μικρέ; Πόσες φορές δεν τραγούδαγα στη δικιά μου: As sure as night is dark and day is light / I keep you on my mind both day and night / and happiness I‘ve known proves that is right / because you‘re mine / I walk the line, κι αυτή με κοιτούσε λες κι η ευτυχία εκείνης της στιγμής θα κράταγε για πάντα. Ξυπνούσα το πρωί στο κελί, έπλενα τα μούτρα μου, βούρτσιζα τα δόντια μου κι έκανα την πρωινή γυμναστική, ποτέ μου δεν ξέχναγα να γυμναστώ, ποτέ, ούτε μια μέρα τα πρώτα χρόνια. Ήθελα να είμαι προετοιμασμένος για την έξοδο, το πίστευα δηλαδή ακόμα πως θα ‘ρθει ένα πρωί, να, σαν κι αυτό που θα ξημερώσει σε λίγο, που θα μου ανοίξουν την πόρτα και θα με αφήσουν να πάω στη γυναίκα μου και στο παιδί μου, γιατί ο δικαστής, λέει, θα είχε καταλάβει επιτέλους ότι δεν ήθελα να το σκοτώσω το κάθαρμα, αλλά δεν μπορούσα να κάνω αλλιώς, γιατί αν το σκεφτείς ‒μεταξύ μας τώρα‒ δεν είχα κι άλλη επιλογή… Να σε ρωτήσω κάτι; Εσύ τι θα ‘κανες στη θέση μου; Το ξέρω ότι δεν έχει νόημα τώρα πια ούτε κι είσαι υποχρεωμένος να απαντήσεις, αλλά εγώ σε ρωτάω, φιλαράκι: τι θα ‘κανες στη θέση μου; Γύρισα ένα πρωί απ’ τα χωράφια ξαφνικά, γιατί είχα χτυπήσει το χέρι μου στη μηχανή και είδα το αμάξι του παρκαρισμένο μπροστά στη φάρμα. Πάγωσα ολόκληρος. Θόλωσα. Ύστερα από τόσους μήνες δεν μπορούσα να φανταστώ ότι θα μας ανακάλυπτε ο μπάσταρδος. «Έχει άλλα τέσσερα παιδιά, ούτε που θα μας ψάξει, ξέχνα το», έλεγε η γυναίκα κι όσο περνούσε ο καιρός την πίστευα όλο και περισσότερο. Άρχισα να τρέχω μέχρι να μου κοπεί η ανάσα. Ανέβηκα τα σκαλιά πατώντας στον αέρα και βρέθηκα μπροστά στο δωμάτιο της Μόλι που ακουγόταν να κλαίει με ουρλιαχτά και να παρακαλάει. Άνοιξα την πόρτα και τον βρήκα ιδρωμένο κι απαίσιο, όπως τον ήξερα, να την κλοτσάει με τις λασπωμένες μπότες του στα πλευρά. Μ’ εκείνες τις μπότες που κλότσαγε τις κότες ο βρωμιάρης… Αηδίασα. Τα λιγδωμένα του μαλλιά κρεμόντουσαν μπροστά στο πρόσωπό του. Ήτανε μανιασμένος. Απ’ τα πόδια της πεσμένης Μόλι έσταζε αίμα. «Κάθαρμα, θα σε τελειώσω», του φώναξα και χίμηξα πάνω του. Ανέβηκα και τον έπιασα απ’ το λαιμό. Δεν καταλάβαινα πόνο. Αλλά ο τύπος δεν παλευόταν εύκολα. Ήτανε νέος ακόμα, βλέπεις, και γεροδεμένος, δεν τον κατάφερνα με τίποτα. Τον δάγκωσα με μανία στο μπράτσο, όμως αυτός με μια λαβή με κόλλησε στον τοίχο χωρίς να καταλάβω πως…

Μ’ ακούς; Ακούς; Έλα σου μιλάω…

Έλεγα για τη λαβή. Επειδή ήμουνα γρήγορος, μπόρεσα να του ξεφύγω, να έτσι, βρέθηκα πίσω του και του ‘δωσα μια γερή σπρωξιά την ώρα που το μωρό μου είχε αρχίσει να χάνει τις αισθήσεις του. Ώσπου να καταφέρει να σηκωθεί στα πόδια του, είχα ήδη βγάλει τη μικρή μπερέτα απ’ το ερμάρι και την είχα στρέψει τρέμοντας καταπάνω του. Το όπλο που πάντα ονειρευόμουν ήτανε δώρο του Οδοντογλυφίδα για το ταξίδι, «από μένα, ρε μαλάκα, για να μην σας πειράξει κανείς», τον θυμάμαι να μου λέει το απόγευμα πριν φύγουμε. Και το αστείο ήταν ότι την είχε αγοράσει από κείνον την μπερέτα, από το άθλιο παράνομο μαγαζάκι του. Σηκώθηκε, ίσιωσε το σώμα του και με κοίταξε με παρανοϊκό βλέμμα. Σαν να μην υπήρχα μπροστά του, σαν να μη με έβλεπε καν, έφτυσε κατάχαμα και συνέχισε να κλοτσάει την πεσμένη Μόλι που σφάδαζε. Εκεί δεν άντεξα άλλο. Απλά δεν άντεξα, πως το λένε… Πήρα βαθιά ανάσα κι ευθυγράμμισα το χέρι μου πιάνοντάς το με το άλλο σφιχτά, μπουνιά γερή. Μου ανέβηκε το αίμα στο κεφάλι, φίλε. Καταλαβαίνεις τη θέση μου; Θόλωσα, χτύπησα κόκκινο. Πάτησα τη σκανδάλη χωρίς να το σκεφτώ καλά καλά. Είναι τόσο απλό να κάνεις φόνο, ούτε που το φαντάζεσαι πόσο εύκολο. Του κατάφερα μια πιστολιά κατευθείαν στο δόξα πατρί, μετά του άδειασα όλο το γεμιστήρα στο στήθος, μπαμ, μπαμ, μπαμ. Έπεσε και δεν σάλεψε εκατοστό, ούτε καν όπως στις ταινίες πριν να ξεψυχήσει ο ήρωας. Το αίμα του μπλέχτηκε με το αίμα της Μόλι στο πάτωμα. Πήρα το μωρό μου στα χέρια κι έτρεξα προς το αμάξι του θείου. Επειδή ήξερα πως δεν είχα να περιμένω κανέναν, οδήγησα μόνος μου σαν δαιμονισμένος μέχρι την πόλη. Το σπλάχνο μου σώθηκε την τελευταία στιγμή, φίλε. Την πιο τελευταία στιγμή. Στο νοσοκομείο, όμως, λίγο πριν μου πει ο γιατρός τα ευχάριστα, τρεις μπάτσοι μπούκαραν μέσα και μου πέρασαν χειροπέδες. Από την ανοιχτή πόρτα έβλεπα τη Μόλι στο κρεβάτι, ήσυχη και ασφαλή να κοιμάται. Την ώρα που με σέρνανε στο περιπολικό εγώ τραγουδούσα, ήμουνα λυτρωμένος, δε μ’ ένοιαζε. Ούτε που αντιστάθηκα. Because you‘re mine / I walk the line. Α, ρε Τζόνι, και να ‘ξερες…

Κοιμάσαι; Όχι; Αν θες να κοιμηθείς να πέσεις, σ’ το ‘πα και πριν. Δε θες; Καλά. Δώσε τσιγάρο. Σε ρωτάω λοιπόν: εσύ τι θα ‘κανες στη θέση μου; Όχι, τώρα που σ’ τα ‘πα, τι θα ‘κανες; Δε θα τον έστελνες έξι πόδια κάτω απ’ τη γη; Όχι, πες μου, πες… 

 

Ήτανε 13 Ιανουαρίου του 1968, ποτέ δεν θα την ξεχάσω εκείνη τη μέρα. Δεν είχα καταφέρει να κλείσω μάτι όλο το βράδυ περιμένοντας τη συναυλία. Ο Τόνι Σιμάνσκι, ένας κατάδικος που κοιμόταν στο ίδιο κελί μ’ εμένα, πριν σκοτώσει τρεις σ’ ένοπλη ληστεία είχε δουλέψει ηχολήπτης με τον Τζόνι σε μια απ’ τις πρώτες του περιοδείες και τον ήξερε. Απίστευτο; Είχαμε τρελαθεί απ’ τη χαρά μας και οι δυο. Για μέρες προβάραμε τραγούδια, ξεσκονίζαμε στίχους. Ο ένας έκοβε κι ο άλλος έραβε. Να πούμε κι αυτό, να πούμε κι εκείνο… Ξέρεις τώρα. Λίγες μέρες πριν έρθει ο Τζόνι στη φυλακή, ομολόγησα στον Τόνι πως είχα σκαρώσει ένα τραγουδάκι ειδικά για την περίσταση. Ένα τραγούδι που είχα βγάλει απ’ την ψυχή μου, πολύ αληθινό. Με ρεφρέν, μουσική και όλα. Τον παρακάλεσα να μου πει τη γνώμη του. Εκείνος διάβασε τους στίχους και μου ζήτησε να του μουρμουρίσω το ρυθμό. Με αγκάλιασε, με φίλησε δακρυσμένος και μου υποσχέθηκε ότι θα έκανε ό,τι μπορούσε να φτάσει το τραγούδι ως τον Τζόνι. Με άδεια του διοικητή ηχογραφήσαμε το κομμάτι σε μια παμπάλαιη μονοκάναλη κονσόλα που μας έστειλαν απ’ το Σακραμέντο και το γράψαμε σε κασέτα. Γρατζούναγα την κιθάρα με δυσκολία, αλλά τα βασικά ακόρντα τα θυμόμουνα και τα κατάφερνα κουτσά στραβά να το πω ανθρώπινα. Ο Κλάρενς έκανε κάτι τηλέφωνα, ήξερε ακόμα κόσμο στους κύκλους των μουσικών. Χωρίς πολλές ελπίδες περιμέναμε να φτάσει η μέρα της συναυλίας. Στο μεταξύ άρχισε να μου διηγείται ιστορίες για τον Τζόνι, ιστορίες που δεν ήξερα και με συγκινήσανε. Μου είπε για τον αδελφό του που έχασε μικρός, για τη σκληρή ζωή του στα μπαμπακοχώραφα. Εσείς τώρα, φίλε, τα βρίσκετε όλα έτοιμα. Εκείνες τις εποχές δεν υπήρχε τίποτα, σου δίνανε ένα κομμάτι γη κι έπρεπε να φας τα χέρια σου για να ζήσεις, να γίνεις χίλια κομμάτια. Ζόρικα τα πράγματα σου λέω, όχι όπως τώρα, πολύ ζόρικα. Κι η φυλακή ακόμα, άμα το συγκρίνεις, τεμπελιά σκέτη είναι… Παραμονή της συναυλίας το πρωί μας ζητήσανε στο διοικητήριο. Τσακιστήκαμε να πάμε. Ο Πέρκινς, ένας καλός δεσμοφύλακας που με συμπαθούσε, είπε πως ο μάνατζερ του κυρίου Κας είχε τηλεφωνήσει από το ξενοδοχείο και ζήταγε άδεια για τη χρήση του τραγουδιού στη συναυλία, να υπογράψουμε κάτι χαρτιά. Έβαλα τα κλάματα από τη χαρά μου και πρέπει να σου πω ότι δεν είχα κλάψει ούτε τη μέρα που πρωτοείδα τη Μόλι και το μωρό στο επισκεπτήριο. Αν όλα πήγαιναν καλά, ο Κας ήθελε να συμπεριλάβει το τραγούδι και στο δίσκο που θα έβγαζε αργότερα. Δέχτηκα χωρίς δεύτερη κουβέντα. Νωρίς το απόγευμα της άλλης μέρας πλυθήκαμε εκτάκτως και ντυθήκαμε ρούχα κανονικά, μας έκαναν μια μικρή κατήχηση να προσέξουμε τη συμπεριφορά μας και μας κατέβασαν στην καφετέρια σε δεκάδες. Καθώς κοιτάγαμε τα στημένα όργανα, την ντραμς, τα μικρόφωνα, νιώθαμε σα να ξαναγεννιόμασταν, να ξεκινούσανε όλα απ’ την αρχή. Μια συναυλία εκεί μέσα, μόνο για μας, ασύλληπτο. Για χρόνια κανείς δεν είχε κάνει τίποτα ειδικά για μας, τίποτα που να χαϊδεύει τα κουρασμένα μας μυαλά. Για χρόνια ζούσαμε ξεχασμένοι, πεταμένοι στα τσιμέντα να υπάρχουμε ζωντανοί-νεκροί. Ξέρεις τι είναι να μη δίνει άνθρωπος δεκάρα για σένα; Δεν περιμέναμε τίποτα κι ύστερα αυτό, εκείνη η συναυλία ξαφνικά…

 

Ο Τζόνι βγήκε στην πρόχειρη σκηνή και μας καλωσόρισε με την καουμπόικη φωνή του. Hello, I’m Johnny Cash, είπε, όπως έλεγε πάντα στις συναυλίες του. Ήμουνα όρθιος κάπου στη μέση της αίθουσας και παραληρούσα. Δεν έχω βάλει μέσα μου ποτέ καμιά ουσία, ορκίζομαι γι’ αυτό, ούτε και φούμαρα ποτέ τίποτα άλλο πέρα απ’ τον καπνό του τσιγάρου. Όμως εκείνη τη βραδιά θα ‘παιρνα όρκο πως είχε μπει στον οργανισμό μου κάτι που με ξεπερνούσε, που είχε το σώμα μου στον απόλυτο έλεγχό του, σαν ναρκωτικό… Τραγούδαγα δυνατά όλα τα τραγούδια, άκουγα κάθε λέξη που μας έλεγε στις παύσεις, τα αστεία και τα σοβαρά του. Έπαιρνα δύναμη, με κάθε στίχο πιο πολύ, με κάθε τραγούδι πιο μεγάλη. Έπαιρνα δύναμη ν’ αντέξω περισσότερο. Κι άρχισα να καταλαβαίνω πράγματα μέσα από τη μουσική και τα λόγια του Τζόνι. Τον έβλεπα στη σκηνή κι ήταν για μένα σαν ένας σύντροφος απ’ την παλιοπαρέα που τα κατάφερε στη ζωή του και δεν κύλησε στα σκατά κι ο θεός τον προίκισε να γράφει τραγούδια για μας όλους. Όταν ανήγγειλε το δικό μου τραγούδι, φαντάζεσαι τι έγινε, παραλίγο να γκρεμιστεί η αίθουσα. Οι διπλανοί μου με σήκωσαν στα χέρια. Αν κλείσω τα μάτια μου, μπορώ να θυμηθώ ακόμα και σήμερα τη βουή από την καφετέρια, τα σφυρίγματα και τα χειροκροτήματα, το χτυποκάρδι μου και τη χαρά μου. Το ‘χε φέρει στα μέτρα του το τραγούδι ο μάστορας και παρά τις λίγες πρόβες το ‘πε καταπληκτικά… Υπάρχουν, φίλε, κάποιες στιγμές στη ζωή που σφραγίζονται στο μυαλό σου, σημαντικές στιγμές. Ο ήχος της μπερέτας… Η φωνή του Τζόνι εκείνο τον Ιανουάριο του ’68… Αυτές είναι σίγουρα οι δικές μου…

Σε κούρασα πάλι. Σε βλέπω, βαριέσαι. Οκέι, φίλε. Ένα μόνο θα σου πω, τελευταίο. Όταν έφυγα από την καφετέρια, είχα ξανά πίστη κι ελπίδα για μένα, γιατί πάντα πίστευα πως δεν είμαι μέσα μου κακός. Απλά ήμουνα άτυχος και τιμωρήθηκα για κάτι που δεν μπορούσα να αποφύγω. Δεν ξέρω αν με καταλαβαίνεις…

…Ε, ακούς; Μου φαίνεται πως αρχίζει να ξημερώνει. Αν κοιτάξεις από δω, θα δεις την αχνάδα στο βάθος. Μια καινούργια μέρα. Σουλουπώσου και πιες μια γουλιά καφέ γιατί θα χτυπήσει το τηλέφωνο σε λίγο κι άμα ακούσουν τη φωνή σου έτσι θα σε πάρουνε χαμπάρι. Εντάξει, κοιμήθηκες λιγάκι, αλλά είναι κρίμα να την πληρώσεις κιόλας. Ήσουνα καλή συντροφιά, φίλε. Σ’ ευχαριστώ που ανέχτηκες τη φλυαρία μου. Αλήθεια. Έχω να μιλήσω καιρό με άνθρωπο. Αν μπορούσα, θα σ’ το ξεπλήρωνα, αλλά μάλλον δεν μπορώ. Εγώ είμαι έτοιμος πάντως, μην ανησυχείς. Έχω πλυθεί, έχω ντυθεί, τα πάντα. Ξημερώνει καινούργια μέρα, για ρίξε μια ματιά έξω. Θα με περιμένει πέρα η γυναίκα κι η κόρη μου με το μικρό της. Μεγαλεία… Αυτό είναι σίγουρο, θα ‘ναι στημένες στο τζάμι. Έχουνε να ‘ρθουνε κάμποσες βδομάδες, αλλά τι να πεις, δεν τους κρατάω κακία, κουραστήκανε κι αυτές. Ορίστε, να, χτυπάει το τηλέφωνο. Σ’ το ‘πα, ρε φίλε, δε σ’ το ‘πα; Βήξε λίγο, άντε, θα σε καταλάβουνε. Τι λέει; Πάμε; Εγώ είμαι έτοιμος, πάντως να μην ανησυχείς καθόλου. Είμαι έτοιμος.

Translator Notes


Christos Asteriou’s “The Last Night” is inspired by the true story of Glenn Sherley, a prisoner who began a career as a singer–songwriter after one of his songs was sung and then released by Johnny Cash in the album At Folsom Prison. It is therefore a story about the transformative and redemptive powers of both the lyric voice and, metaphorically, translation itself: of finding oneself in/through another’s song. Indeed, the narrator’s repeated questions—“See?” and “You know?”—invokes both his interlocutor, the prison guard who remains silent throughout the story, and the reader to put him/herself in his position. In a related fashion, Asteriou’s layering of various types of subcultural musical forms —the blues in the U.S. context and rembetika, in the Greek—becomes the means for identification across cultures, times, and locations. Narrated by a prisoner during the night before his execution, the story calls to mind Ralph Ellison’s famous description of the blues as “an impulse to keep the painful details and episodes of a brutal experience alive in one's aching consciousness, to finger its jagged grain, and to transcend it, not by the consolation of philosophy but by squeezing from it a near-tragic, near-comic lyricism.” The main challenge of translating this story, then, was to remain true to this blues lyricism: to portray the pain of a life gone horribly wrong in a voice hovering between tragedy and comedy, resignation and transcendence. I capture the idiosyncracies of the narrator’s voice by engaging the blues and rembetika intertexts—their rhythms and lyrics—that structure the story.


Patricia Felisa Barbeito

×